The first Trotters school, eight months later

Eight months since the opening of our first school we are overjoyed to see children still clutching their cuddly elephants in the hills of rural Nepal. At the opening ceremony in April, every pupil in our school received a Kipu, for many the first and only toy of their very own.

Though a little on the dirtier side, Kipu is still happy in the hills of Hille Taksar but we are pleased to report that he is not the only happy party. We have been overwhelmed by the change that has overcome the school community.

So empassioned by their new building the teachers and students have embraced new ways of learning. The school has transformed from one of broken buildings and rote learning to one of solid classrooms full of enthusiastic and engaged pupils.

Bare walls have been decorated with handmade posters, proudly displaying the class’s latest learnings. Pupils have formed ‘classroom agreements’ where they promise to keep classrooms neat and clean and ask their teachers “many questions about the lesson”.

Unlike many schools in Nepal, here teachers have encouraged their classes to take responsibility for their education and colourful ‘Job Charts’ have taken to the walls. Children take it in turn to place their name labels in the roles of ‘Class Captain’, ‘Attendance Checker’ and even ‘Entertainer’.

The Library continues to be a hive of activity, with pupils still excited by such a large and varied collection of books. Our Librarian tells us that on average, each child will borrow at least one book a week, which in a community where most homes own no books, is still considered a luxury.

The Library continues to be a hive of activity, with pupils still excited by such a large and varied collection of books. Our Librarian tells us that on average, each child will borrow at least one book a week, which in a community where most homes own no books, is still considered a luxury.

Thanks to your support and the sales of Kipu, the Hille Taksar community has experienced a new lease of life and is overjoyed to be able to improve the education their children are receiving.

But we want to do more. For every child in Hille Taksar that has access to a library brimming with books and classroom complete with floors, windows and doors….there are hundreds of children that do not.

We want to change this. Through sales of Mahi, our snowy white Limited Edition Jellycat elephant, we hope to build a second school in another impoverished community in rural Nepal. Meet Mahi today and change the lives of some of the world’s poorest children.

Mahi, which means ‘Great’ in Nepali, was named by the Children of Thomas’s London Day Schools, Kensington.

 

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